Scholarly Community for the Study of Song, Yuan, and the Conquest Dynasties

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Scholars in Song, Yuan, and Conquest Dynasty Studies

1.  To submit a self-introduction, click here.

     To revise a self-description, just resubmit with a note explaining whether the new description is to be added to the old,
     or to replace it.

2.  Scholars who have submitted self-introductions:

Peter K. Bol
     Harvard University

 
Email: pkbol@fas.harvard.edu
URL: http://scholar.harvard.edu/pkbol/home

I am interested in China's intellectual history and the roles of the shi as a locally-instantiated national elite. In addition I am fascinated by computational approaches to the handling of lots of data. the China Historical GIS and China Biographical Database represent this.

 
Beverly Bossler
     University of California, Davis

 
Email: bjbossler@ucdavis.edu
URL:

I am interested in the social, intellectual, and cultural histories of the Song and Yuan dynasties, with special attention to gender and family relations. I recently finished a book called Courtesans, Concubines, and the Cult of Female Fidelity (Harvard East Asia Center, forthcoming 2012). My next project will look at the role of "guest" relationships in defining social and gender hierarchies Song society.

 
Hugh R. Clark
     Ursinus College

 
Email: hclark@ursinus.edu
URL:

I have spent my professional life focused on southern Fujian, on which I have published a book on late Tang-Song economic history and one on extended kinship structures. I am now working on the integration of the South into the Sinitic world.

 
Michael A. Fuller
     UCI
Email: mafuller@uci.edu           
URL: http://www.faculty.uci.edu/profile.cfm?faculty_id=2794

My basic interest is Chinese poetry and poetics and their intersection with intellectual history. My manuscript on the transformation of shi poetry from Huang Tingjian to the end of the Southern Song and its relation to the rise of Daoxue is in copy-editing at Harvard.

 
Anne Gerritsen
     University of Warwick

 
Email: a.t.gerritsen@warwick.ac.uk
URL: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/history/people/staff_index/agerritsen/

I started out as a student of local history, working specifically on Jizhou Prefecture in Jiangxi during the Southern Song, Yuan and Ming dynasties. My 2007 Brill book on Jizhou focused on the writings by literati on temples and other local institutions. At the University of Warwick, I have been drawn into the study of global history, and I now work on the interaction between global and local in another Jiangxi place: the porcelain production centre of Jingdezhen.

 
Lau, Nap-yin 柳立言
     Institute of History and Philology,
     Academia Sinica

 
Email: nylau@mail.ihp.sinica.edu.tw
URL: http://www.ihp.sinica.edu.tw/~twsung/scholar/scholarinfo/lny.htm

My recent interests are legal and social histories. Some past works are published in 宋代的家庭和法律 (2008), and a new book entitled 宋代的宗教,身分與司法, with focus on Buddhist monks and concubinies, will come out in June 2012. I hope to write two more books before an early retirement in 2015, and then devote myself to social work in the footsteps of Song literati.

 
Yugen Wang
     University of Oregon
Email: ygwang@uoregon.edu
URL:
 
My primary area is classical Chinese poetry and poetics from the earliest to about the Song-Yuan period. My book on eleventh-century print culture and the poetic thought of Huang Tingjian, Ten Thousand Scrolls: Reading and Writing in the Poetics of Huang Tingjian and the Late Northern Song, was published by the Harvard Asia Center in 2011. My ongoing second book explores the materiality in the representation of emotion in classical Chinese poetry.

 
John Timothy Wixted Email: TimWixted@hotmail.com
URL: http://www.JohnTimothyWixted.com
 
Mostly on the website as PDFs: (1) Poems on Poetry: Lit. Criticism by Yuan Haowen (1190-1257), 1982. (2) “A Finding List for Ch., Jpn., and West.-Language Annotation to and Trans. of Poetry by Yüan Hao-wen,” Bulletin of Sung-Yüan Studies 17, 1981. (3) 最近西方学术界关于金代之研究, in 元好问及辽金文学研究, 1998. (4) “Some Chin Dynasty (金代) Issues in Literary Criticism,” Tamkang Review 21.1, 1990. (5) “Yüan Hao-wen,” in Indiana Companion to Trad. Chinese Lit., 1986. (6) Trans., Yoshikawa Kōjirō, Five Hundred Years of Chinese Poetry, 1150-1650, 1989.

 


If you have any questions, please contact Michael Fuller.